Basic Science Subcommittee

 

Basic Science Subcommittee  

Co-chairs:

Marina Romero-Ramos, PhD

Andrew Singleton, PhD

 

Veerle Baekelandt, PhD

Angela Cenci-Nilsson, MD, PhD

Michela Deleidi, MD, PhD
 
Céline Galvagnion-Büll, PhD

Ashley Harms, PhD

Kevin McFarthing, PhD

Darren Moore, PhD

Tiago Outiero, PhD

Coro Paison Ruiz, PhD

Ian Sargent, PhD

Leonidas Stefanis, MD

Jose Luis Venero, PhD

Miquel Vila, PhD

Amanda Woerman, PhD 

Marina Romero-Ramos, PhD

Andrew Singleton, PhD

Veerle Baekelandt, PhD

Angela Cenci-Nilsson, MD, PhD

Michela Deleidi, MD, PhD

Céline Galvagnion-Büll, PhD

Ashley Harms, PhD

Kevin McFarthing

Kevin McFarthing, PhD originally a biochemist, Kevin led R&D groups in life sciences with Amersham, diagnostics with Serono; and pharmaceuticals and consumer products with Reckitt Benckiser. He also ran the Innovation Fixer consultancy business specialising in innovation management. He now co-edits the Clinical Trial Highlights section of the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. Kevin also produces the Hope List, a collation of programs for new Parkinson’s therapies. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2012.

Darren Moore, PhD

Tiago Outiero, PhD

Coro Paisán-Ruiz

Coro Paison Ruiz, PhD has an academic appointment as a tenure-track Associate Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (New York). She received her B.Sc. degree from the University of Navarra (Spain) and her PhD degree from the Basque Country University (Spain). She continued her post-doctoral training at the National Institutes of Health (USA) and the UCL Institute of Neurology (UK). Her laboratory focuses on the identification and functional characterization of genes underlying Parkinson’s disease (PD), parkinsonism, and related neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Paisán-Ruiz has made significant contributions to the understanding of the genetic etiology of parkinsonism and related disorders by identifying the first pathogenic mutations in LRRK2, PLA2G6, SYNJ1, and PTRHD1 genes in families with parkinsonism as well as through the identification of PRKRA and Vac14 as causative genes for recessive dystonia and parkinsonism. Her team works closely with other researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in modeling disease processes in animals (zebrafish) to enable the design of intervention strategies through validated drug targets.

Ian Sargent

Ian Sargent, PhD he has a BSc in Zoology (University of Aberystwyth) and a PhD in Immunology (University of London). Worked at the University of Oxford for 37 years where he was Professor of Reproductive Science.Worked in the field of reproductive immunology and trophoblast biology and published over 200 research papers and book chapters on a wide range of topics including the immunology of pregnancy, pre-eclampsia, feto-maternal cell traffic, trophoblast microvesicles and exosomes, HLA-G and early human embryo development and implantation. He was Scientific Director of the Oxford IVF Unit for over 20 years and a work package leader in a European Network of Excellence on Embryo Implantation. He was on the editorial boards of Human Reproduction and Journal of Reproductive Immunology, a scientific advisor for Science Foundation Ireland, Novartis, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Mayo Clinic and he was a member of the Wellcome Trust Physiological Sciences Funding Committee, Wellbeing of Women Research Advisory Group and Medical Research Council College of Experts. He also organised three international conferences. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2015 and took ill health retirement that year. He is actively involved in the Parkinson’s community and co-hosts the Parkinson’s UK “First Steps” course in Oxford for people newly diagnosed with Parkinson’s and their supporters, He is a member of the Parkinson’s UK Oxford Branch Committee, takes part in research projects at the University of Oxford and attend weekly PD Warrior physiotherapy sessions.

Leonidas Stefanis

Leonidas Stefanis, MD following his MD and PhD studies in the University of Athens Medical School, moved in 1991 to the US, where he trained as Resident in Neurology at Columbia University, New York.  In 1995, he embarked on a post-doctoral fellowship. Dr. Stefanis is heading the largest clinical Department of Neurology in Greece, and is involved in various aspects of clinical and research work ongoing within the Department.  He teaches Medical Students of the University of Athens during their fifth year in their rotation through Neurology, while he also teaches at various post-graduate programs, such as Neurosciences, Molecular Medicine, Molecular and Applied Physiology, Clinical Neurophsyiology (which he also coordinates) and others.  Overall, Leonidas Stefanis is a clinician-scientist working in the field of Neurology, with a particular clinical and basic science interest in synucleinopathies.  He has published more than 180 peer-reviewed manuscripts (on PubMed), he has received numerous competitive grants to support his research, he is regularly invited to international meetings, and he is widely acknowledged as an expert in genetic forms of Parkinsonism and in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies. 

Jose Luis Venero, PhD

Miquel Vila, MD, PhD

Miquel Vila, MD, PhD obtained his MD degree from the University of Barcelona and a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Paris. He received his PhD training at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris under the supervision of Dr. Etienne C. Hirsch, devoted to the study of the functional consequences of dopaminergic neurodegeneration on the functioning of the basal ganglia. He then worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the laboratory of Dr. Serge Przedborski at Columbia University in New York, where he subsequently obtained a position as an Assistant Professor of Neurology, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease. Currently, he is a Professor at the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA) and leads the Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group at the Vall d’Hebron Research Institute in Barcelona.

Dr. Vila’s work has been devoted to the functional changes in the circuitry of the basal ganglia and the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in Parkinson's disease using experimental animal models in rodents and non-human primates, with special emphasis on the role of mitochondria dysfunction, activation of programmed cell death pathways, alpha-synuclein aggregation/propagation, neuroinflammation and age-dependent neuromelanin accumulation.

Amanda Woerman

Amanda Woerman, PhD is an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research focuses on protein misfolding in neurodegenerative disease. In particular, her lab studies how the protein alpha-synuclein misfolds into distinct conformations to give rise to either Parkinson's disease or multiple system atrophy. Dr. Woerman received her PhD from George Washington University and completed her postdoctoral training with Dr. Stanley Prusiner at UC San Francisco.

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