Steering Committee

  

Steering Committee  

Co-chair:

Marie-Francoise Chesselet, MD, PhD

Co-chair:

Roger Barker, BA, MBBS, PhD, MRCP, FMedSci 

 

Patrik Brundin, MD, PhD  

 

Fulvio Capitanio

  Francisco Cardoso, MD, PhD, FAAN
 

Emma Collins

Alice Nieuwboer, PhD, PT

Linda Olson, MD, FACR

Russell Patton  

Marina Romero-Ramos, PhD  

Israel Robledo  

Michael Schwarzschild, MD, PhD  

David Standaert, MD, PhD  

A. Jon Stoessl, CM, MD, FRCPC  

Ryosuke Takahashi, MD, PhD  

Ronnie Todaro, MPH  

Eduardo Tolosa, MD  

Claudia Trenkwater, MD   

Miquel Vila, PhD 


Marie-Francoise Chesselet, MD, PhD

Marie-Francoise Chesselet, MD, PhD is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Neurology and Neurobiology and Emeritus Charles H. Markham Professor of Neurology, in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. After receiving her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in Paris, France, she held research positions in France and faculty positions at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and the University of Pennsylvania, before joining UCLA in 1996. At UCLA, Dr. Chesselet chaired the Department of Neurobiology from 2002 to 2013 and was Interim Chair of the Department of Neurology (2015-2016). She directed the Center for the Study of Parkinson’s Disease, the NINDS-funded UCLA UDALL Center for Parkinson’s disease research, the NIEHS-funded UCLA Center for Gene Environment in Parkinson’s Disease, and the UCLA Advanced Center for Parkinson’s Disease Research of the American Parkinson Disease Association. Chesselet has directed graduate programs at the University of Pennsylvania and UCLA and the NINDS-funded Training Program in Neural Repair from 1998 to 2014. Until her retirement in 2016, her laboratory conducted research on the molecular mechanisms of disorders of the basal ganglia and new treatments for Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Her work has been supported by the NIH, the Department of Defense, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, Cure HD Initiative, CIRM, and several philanthropies and biopharmaceutical companies. Chesselet has served on the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council and the Science Advisory Boards of the APDA, the Michel J. Fox Foundation, the Hereditary Disease Foundation and the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, former Chair and current Secretary of its section on Neuroscience. Currently, Chesselet is the President of the World Parkinson Coalition, and a member of the Scientific Committees for the Canadian Weston Brain Institute, Canadian Vanier Fellowships, the Italian Telethon, the Hereditary Disease Foundation, and a consultant for philanthropies and Biotech companies.

Roger Barker, BA, MBBS, PhD, MRCP, FMedSci

Roger Barker, BA, MBBS, PhD, MRCP, FMedSci is the Professor of Clinical Neuroscience and Honorary Consultant in Neurology at the University of Cambridge and at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge UK. He trained at Oxford and London and has been in his current position for over 20 years having completed an MRC Clinician Scientist Fellowship just prior to this. 

His main interests are in the neurodegenerative disorders of the nervous system in particular Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. He combines basic research looking at novel therapies (including cell transplants) to treat these conditions. This included co-ordinating an EU funded Transeuro project looking at fetal cell grafting in patients with early PD. He is now involved in moving stem cell based therapies to clinic for this condition as well as working with companies developing novel gene therapies for PD. He has also undertaken extensive clinically based work on defining the natural history and heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease and its basis. This has recently led to him developing novel models to explore the cellular basis for the different types of PD. He is Co-Editor in chief of the Journal of Neurology and Associate Editor on the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. He is heavily involved with the Cure Parkinson's Trust and also works with Parkinson's UK. He is a Director of the ISSCR.

Patrik Brundin, MD, PhD

Patrik Brundin, MD, PhD is Associate Director of Research and Director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Science at Van Andel Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA. He is one of the top cited researchers in the field of neuroscience with more than 300 publications on Parkinson’s disease and related topics. Dr. Brundin has more than 35 years of experience studying neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson’s disease pathogenesis and therapeutic neural transplantation into people with Parkinson’s. His current research focuses on pathogenic mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease as well as the development of new therapies that slow or stop disease progression or that repair damaged brain circuits. He was among the first to articulate the “prion-like” hypothesis of Parkinson’s, which describes how abnormal proteins related to the disease spread from cell to cell in the brain, causing the cellular damage that perpetuates Parkinson’s.

In addition to managing his laboratory at Van Andel Institute and serving as director of the Institute’s Center for Neurodegenerative Science, he is the co-editor-in-chief of the  Journal of Parkinson’s Disease , a member of the World Parkinson Coalition’s Board of Directors, and chair of the Linked Clinical Trials committee, which aims to repurpose already approved drugs to treat Parkinson’s. Dr. Brundin also has coordinated multiple international research programs. He is heavily involved in the Parkinson’s community and works closely with advocates to find ways to find ways to further research and to improve the quality of life for people with Parkinson’s. 
Dr. Brundin is the Program Chair for WPC 2022.

Fulvio Capitanio

Francisco Cardoso, MD, PhD, FAAN

Miquel Vila, PhD

Emma Collins is the Chief Executive Officer of Parkinson’s Victoria, a NFP company providing health information and education to people living with Parkinson’s disease and their families, health care professionals and the broader community in Victoria, Australia. In addition, the organisation supports the development of more effective treatments and a cure for Parkinson’s through the funding of scientific and clinical research. Prior to joining Parkinson’s Victoria as CEO, Emma held a number of senior management roles including Executive Manager, Carer Representation and Engagement with Carer’s Victoria and General Manager, Community Services with Melton City Council where she successfully built community support to secure government and philanthropic funds for disadvantaged and vulnerable communities. Emma is passionate about people living with Parkinson's and their families leading full lives.

Miquel Vila, MD, PhD

Alice Nieuwboer, PhD, PT works as a full professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Leuven. She is head of the Neuromotor Rehabilitation Research Group. She and her team are investigating the mechanisms of gait and balance disturbances in Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as upper limb motor problems. Coming from a motor control perspective, the group established the extraordinary link between freezing of gait and freezing in different effectors. This partially common mechanism is currently refined by ongoing longitudinal work from the group. Alice’s team also investigates the effectiveness of motor learning, virtual reality while walking on a treadmill, offering and withdrawing motor feedback and dual task training. Underlying all these studies is the question whether learning can still occur in neurodegenerative disease and how it will imprint in the brain at the neurological systems level.

Linda Olson, MD

Linda Olson, MD, FACR received her M.D degree from Loma Linda University with the Class of 1976-A. Her residency in Diagnostic Radiology at the White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles was interrupted by a train vs. car accident in 1979. Following a year-long medical leave of absence she completed her training and became certified by the American Board of Radiology in 1981. After a Computed Tomography Fellowship at UCSD she joined the Faculty of the Radiology Department at UCSD where she worked the next 30 years; for twenty of those years she was the Director of Breast Imaging. Some of her awards include: Silver Spoon Award for Teaching Excellence presented by Radiology Residents 1987, Marie Curie Award of the American Association of Women Radiologists 1991, Fellow of the American College of Radiology 1993, Honored Alumna Loma Linda University School of Medicine 1994, UCSD Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award 1996, San Diego County’s 2011 Physicians of Exceptional Excellence “Top Doctors” Award, Loma Linda University School of Medicine “Women in Courage” Award 2012, UCSD Department of Radiology Lifetime Achievement Award 2012. She is married to David W. Hodgens, M.D. and together they have two children, Tiffany Hodgens Johnson and Brian Hodgens, M.D.

Russell Patton

Marina Romero-Ramos, PhD

Israel Robledo

Michael Schwarzschild, MD, PhD

David Standaert, MD, PhD

A. Jon Stoessl, CM, MD, FRCPC

A. Jon Stoessl, CM, MD, FRCPC is Professor & Head of Neurology and Director of the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health at UBC through December 31, 2019. He holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Parkinson’s, is Deputy Editor of Movement Disorders and will be Editor-in-Chief effective January 2020. He has served on numerous other editorial boards including Lancet Neurology and Annals of Neurology. He recently chaired the Scientific Advisory Board of the Parkinson’s Foundation and has recently completed a term as President of the World Parkinson Coalition. He is a Member of the Order of Canada. Dr. Stoessl uses positron emission tomography to study Parkinson’s, including imaging biomarkers, the basis for complications of treatment and mechanisms of the placebo effect. He has published more than 300 papers and book chapters and has been cited more than 15,000 times in the scientific literature.

He has been a Board member since 2012 and co-chaired the WPC 2013, WPC 2016, and WPC 2019.

Ryosuke Takahashi, MD, PhD

Ryosuke Takahashi, MD, PhD graduated from Kyoto University, Japan in 1983. He completed his neurology residency in Kyoto University Hospital and its affiliated hospitals and worked as a staff neurologist at Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital. In 1989, he started basic researches on neurodegenerative disorders and neuronal apoptosis as a staff scientist at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neurosciences, then he worked as a postdoctoral fellow with Prof. John C. Reed at the Burnham Institute, California, USA. He became Laboratory Head at RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Japan, in 1999. In 2005, he was appointed Professor and Chair of Neurology at Kyoto University Hospital and Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine. He served as the chair of the task force for 2011 version of the treatment guidelines for Parkinson’ s disease in Japan. From 2014 to 2018, he served as the President of Japanese Society of Neurology. He also serves as the Vice President of Japanese Society for Neuroscience. He is on the editorial board of Movement Disorders, Journal of Neural Transmission, and Molecular Brain. He has published more than 300 original and review articles in peer-reviewed international journals including Nature, Cell, Neuron, Nature Genetics, Nature Neuroscience and Annals of Neurology. His major research interests are the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms underlying Parkinson’s disease and related disorders and development of disease-modifying therapies against neurodegenerative disorders.

Ronnie Todaro, MPH has served the Parkinson's Foundation for more than a decade. As Chief Operating Officer, she ensures that the foundation’s resources meet the needs and priorities of people living with Parkinson’s through organizational strategy, execution and day-to-day operations. She is a recognized leader in patient engagement at the Foundation and in the community. As an advocate amongst industry, government, academia and nonprofits, she has worked to change the understanding of people with Parkinson’s, seeing that their insights are recognized and drive the foundation’s work in improving treatments and finding a cure. Previously, Ronnie held several leadership positions in the public health field, including her time with Planned Parenthood. She was formerly the Chair of the Patient Leadership Council, which was part of the Executive Committee for the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI). Ronnie also served as a member of the Advisory Panel on Patient Engagement for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) and the Advisory Committee of North America for the Drug Information Association.She has been an invited speaker at national and international conferences hosted by the NIH, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Society for Clinical Trials and the World Parkinson Congress. Ronnie earned her MA in Public Health in Planning and Administration from the University of Michigan and her BA in Public Policy at Cornell University.

Eduardo Tolosa, MD

Eduardo Tolosa , MD obtained his MD degree from the University of Barcelona and received his neurological training at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. He is a founding member and past President of the Movement Disorder Society. He is also past President of the Spanish and of the European Neurological Society.  He is the recipient of the  American Academy of Neurology  2014 Movement Disorders Research Award. Prof. Tolosa is currently Vice Director of Research of the Centro de Investigacion en Red de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas at the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Spain,  Emeritus Professor at the University of Barcelona and Neurology consultant Hospital Clinic Universitary.

Professor Tolosa’s research interests are in movement disorders. He was involved in pioneering studies defining the mechanisms underlying levodopa-related motor fluctuations and  the role of DAT SPECT in the diagnosis of Parkinson disease  and his team has been among the first in Europe to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for Parkinson’s disease, such as subthalamic nucleus stimulation, subcutaneous dopamine agonist infusions and intraduodenal infusions of levodopa. Areas of current research include assessment of non-motor  symptoms in asymptomatic  carriers of Parkinson-associated  genetic mutations and the study of diagnostic  biomarkers in premotor  Parkinson disease.

Claudia Trenkwater, MD

Miquel Vila, PhD

Miquel Vila, PhD obtained his MD degree from the University of Barcelona and a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Paris. He received his PhD training at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris under the supervision of Dr. Etienne C. Hirsch, devoted to the study of the functional consequences of dopaminergic neurodegeneration on the functioning of the basal ganglia. He then worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the laboratory of Dr. Serge Przedborski at Columbia University in New York, where he subsequently obtained a position as an Assistant Professor of Neurology, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease. Currently, he is a Professor at the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA) and leads the Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group at the Vall d’Hebron Research Institute in Barcelona.
Dr. Vila’s work has been devoted to the functional changes in the circuitry of the basal ganglia and the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in Parkinson's disease using experimental animal models in rodents and non-human primates, with special emphasis on the role of mitochondria dysfunction, activation of programmed cell death pathways, alpha-synuclein aggregation/propagation, neuroinflammation and age-dependent neuromelanin accumulation.

BACK TO TOP

Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal